218 W 34th Ave
Anchorage, Alaska 99503

(907) 868-7821

Types of treatment we offer:
> What is Physical Rehabilitation
> What is Physical Rehabilitation
What is Physical Rehabilitation

Chiropractors diagnose and treat a broad range of physical conditions in patients with muscular, nervous, and skeletal problems, especially the spine.

Chiropractors make use of conventional diagnostic tests, such as X-rays, MRIs, and lab work, as well as specific procedures that involve manipulation by hand of various parts of the body. Chiropractors are best known for their ability to correct misalignments of the spine, which are called subluxations. But spinal manipulation is only a small part of what chiropractors do as part of an overall plan to manage and relieve pain and many kinds of ailments. Other kinds of treatments chiropractors are capable of providing include:

     >  Electrotherapy
     >  Therapeutic exercise
     >  Ice/heat therapy, including therapeutic ultrasound
     >  Lifestyle and nutrition counseling
     >  Massage therapy
     >  Physical rehabilitation
     >  Stress management


What is Physical Rehabilitation
> Benefits of Physical Rehabilitation
> Benefits of Physical Rehabilitation
Benefits of Physical Rehabilitation

One of the main causes of pain and disease in the human body can be traced to improper alignment of the vertebrae in your spinal column. This is called a subluxation. Through carefully applied pressure, massage, and manual manipulation of the vertebrae and joints, pressure and irritation on the nerves is relieved and joint mobility is restored, allowing your body to return to its natural state of balance, called homeostasis. Put another way, when the bones in your spine are allowed to go back to their proper positions, the nerve energy can resume its normal flow and your body's natural healing processes can function properly

Physical Rehabilitation is safe and effective.

Physical treatment can be especially helpful in relieving pain of facet syndrome, arthritis, degeneration, aching muscles from accidents and injuries because such conditions respond well to physical treatment. Moreover, scores of patients with many other signs and symptoms have reported significant relief after physical therapy, chiropractic and myofascial release techniques.

Increasingly over the past few decades, the medical community has come to accept and recognize physical rehabilitation care as valid forms of treatment for a variety of neuromusculoskeletal conditions, and as a conservative and effective treatment option for patients with neck and back pain. Moreover, many family clinicians, doctors, PA-Cs, and nurse practitioners now recognize physical therapy, chiropractic care and myofascial therapies and recommend them as the first line of treatment for the entire neuromusculoskeletal system.

Studies by leading medical journals in recent years have confirmed the benefits of the conservative care that is physical rehabilitation:

 >
In 2001, the Center for Clinical Health Policy Research at Duke University concluded in a study that spinal manipulation resulted in almost immediate improvement for headaches and had significantly fewer side effects and longer-lasting relief of tension-type headache than a commonly prescribed medication.
 > In 2001, a study in the Annual of Internal Medicine revealed 831 respondents judged complementary and alternative medicine to be more beneficial than conventional therapy for neck pain, back pain and headaches.
 > A 2007, the Journal of Rheumatology did a systematic review that studied 88 unique trials and noted strong evidence of benefit for maintained pain reduction, improvement of function and positive perceived effect favoring exercise plus mobilization and manipulation.
 > In 2005, authors of the Cochrane Database System Review searched 31 studies and concluded that a multimodal care approach of exercise, combined with mobilization or manipulation reduced pain, improved function and had short and long term perceived global effects.
 > In 2002, a physical therapy study of 200 patients concluded that manipulative therapy and exercise can reduce headaches and the effects are maintained.
Benefits of Physical Rehabilitation
> How Chiropractic Works
> How Chiropractic Works

How Chiropractic Works

Chiropractic is based on the idea of removing imbalances both structural and postural in an effort to allow our body to heal itself. For this to happen the network of nerves and signals from your brain, down your spinal cord, to the network of nerves must be allowed to flow freely without any interruption. Chiropractors have the ability and skill to remove these interruptions or mis-alignments and allow the body to perform as it was meant to.

If you've ever been in a car accident, played a sport, fell down or just bumped into something too hard, it's very possible that you are not functioning at your best due to a misalignment. While there are many potential mechanical or structural causes for misalignment, there are also chemical reasons. For instance, if you smoke or drink excessively or even just have a poor diet, the chemical issues in your body can eventually cause underlying conditions and disease to appear.

Allowing a chiropractor to get you back on track both chemically and structurally will bring your body back to the proper state it should be in to perform at it's peak.


How Chiropractic Works
> What is Subluxation
> What is Subluxation

What is Subluxation?

A subluxation is an abnormal physical relationship between two articulating and/or adjacent boney structures that is producing pain or otherwise abnormal function at that site or at some area distant to it. Medical radiologists often refer to a subluxation as a dislocation. However, because luxation literally means dislocation, we refer to the subluxation as less than a dislocation; hence “sub” luxation.

Subluxations can be caused by a wide range of mechanisms ranging from a minor slip and fall or sudden and unexpected pop in a vehicle collision or any other physical trauma. When a joint is subluxated, it may begin to put pressure on nerves, blood vessels and everything around it. This pressure often comes with a price. The subluxation may interrupt the nerve pathways such that the signals from the body up to the brain and from the brain back to the body causing miscommunications and malfunction.

As time goes by and a subluxation remains untreated, these miscommunications often cause supporting muscles to tighten resulting in additional physical stress to the joints they move. With prolonged abnormal stress comes abnormal wear such that joints and discs can begin to degenerate. This degeneration becomes more difficult to reverse as time goes by as the surrounding muscles, nerves and bones begin to adjust to the new shape. The longer this goes on, the more difficult it is and the longer it takes to get back to more normal position, motion and overall range of motion.

What is Subluxation
> Spinal Degeneration
> Spinal Degeneration

Spinal Degeneration

Degeneration Phase 1
The first stage of spinal degeneration usually begins with misalignment. This may be visualized as a minor loss of normal spine balance, alignment or spinal curvature. The surrounding features of the spine such as nerves, discs and joints are under additional stress which, if left untreated, causes early wear. This stage of the degeneration process may or may not cause pain or show up for years. At this point, there is a good chance that with the proper care, you can return to normal.

Degeneration Phase 2
In the second stage of spinal degeneration, there may be thinning of the disc spaces and early bone spurs may begin to form due to the abnormal stresses over time. The discs get their moisture through a process called imbibition due to normal motion. Without normal motion, the discs start to lose their moisture, cushion and ability to maintain their normal height and spacing. Bone spurring may begin to cause narrowing of the central canal, or lateral openings and can cause significant aches and pains associated at that level or at some distance from the impingement. Usually, there is a still a good chance of significant improvement at this stage by restoring more normal motion with proper care.

Degeneration Phase 3
In the third stage of spinal degeneration, there may be significant physical involvement due to the level of issues here. There is likely to be nerve damage as well as changes in the bones and discs. Our treatment is primarily directed at slowing the degeneration process by improving function as best as possible. Avoiding surgery is a probability and a reasonable goal.

Degeneration Phase 4
In the fourth stage of spinal degeneration, most damage is permanent including scar tissue, nerve damage, bone deformation and spurring. At this point, the condition is irreversible. Management of pain and discomfort is the best option here. Surgical correction may be necessary.


Spinal Degeneration
> Wellness Tips
> Wellness Tips

Wellness Tips

Make sure to do these simple activities the right way as outlined below:

Standing

Posture. Posture. Posture. You don’t have to be perfect, but know that gravity is pulling downward perfectly. You don’t have to stand perfectly but make sure that you keep your chin up, head back over your shoulders and don't slouch. If you know that you are going to be standing for a long period of time, make sure that you wear comfortable shoes. You’ll spend as much as 1/3 of your life on your feet, so buy good shoes that fit and support well.

Sitting

Make sure you have a chair that is supportive. It doesn’t have to be expensive; it just has to fit your body. When you are forced to sit for a long period of time, for instance at a desk job, make sure to get up and stretch about every 20 minutes. Sit with your back against the chair back, place your feet firmly on the floor and don’t cross your legs. If you have a computer screen, try to avoid looking down at your computer screen; it should be about eye level. You’ll spend as much as 1/3 of your life sitting, so buy chairs that fit and support you well.

Lifting

Lifting something is one of the most common ways for you to be injured. Even if the object is light, twisting or pulling in the wrong direction can damage your neck or back. You want to try to bend at the knees and get help if you need to lift something you believe may be too heavy. Lifting is not often the problem; it is lifting without good body mechanics, good balance, lifting too much or too many times that are the common culprits.

Resting or Sleeping

Straining your neck or back while you're sleeping is a very common occurrence. We often fall asleep in awkward positions where we are not supported properly or our necks are at odd angles. Make sure, if you are going to nap or watch TV in bed, that you are in a supported position. Sleeping on your back or side is best and using a pillow under or between your knees is good. And if you often wake up with a pain you didn’t take with you to bed, consider buying a new mattress. You’ll spend as much as 1/3 of your life in bed, so buying a quality mattress that supports you well is a wise investment. A firm mattress for good support without sagging (without hammocking) with a soft topper to reduce pressure points is recommended. Good mattresses last a long time. Buy the best mattress you will allow yourself to buy; you are worth it.

Diet

Everything in moderation; the two main goals we recommend are to maintain a reasonable weight and consume a wide variety of foods; organic when available. Low glycemic index foods should be the norm. Know that fats satisfy hunger; so allow yourself to enjoy some natural fats in moderation. And we recommend enjoying higher-quality foods in lesser amounts to keep the calories in check. All deficiencies in vitamins and minerals have associated diseases as a result of their deficiencies. Taking a good broad-spectrum of good-quality vitamins and minerals beats a deficiency and its disease any day.

Exercise

Make sure that you are adequately and gently stretched out and warmed up. Even if it's something light, like bending and lifting while doing yard work or shoveling snow, it's easy to pull a muscle or injure yourself if you're not warmed up. Brisk walking 3–5 times a week for 30 minutes is highly recommended as it combines exercise, coordination, core strengthening with a light cardio work out and stress relief. Reducing stress, in turn, lowers blood pressure and reduces blood sugar levels.

 

Wellness Tips
> Your First Visit
> Your First Visit

Your First Visit

Be ready to provide your medical history, which will be essential for preparing a course of treatment for you. Medical records, such as diagnostic test results, or imaging results, such as X-rays and MRIs, also will provide important information about your condition.

Certain things in your health history are particularly vital to a chiropractor. This information could provide important clues that will allow your chiropractor to properly diagnose your problem. Such clues include whether you have or have had:

  • Bone disorders, such as osteoporosis
  • Circulatory problems (poor circulation could be a sign that you have a subluxation, for example)
  • Dizziness or blurred vision
  • Heart conditions such as hypertension or high blood pressure
  • Infections, especially those affecting your spine
  • Injuries, such as bone fractures, muscle sprains, or disc injuries
  • Joint disorders such as arthritis
  • Sleep apnea

Be prepared to answer such questions as:

  • Did the onset of your pain immediately follow an injury?
  • Is there anything you do that improves or worsens the pain?
  • When and how did your pain start?
  • Where is the pain centered?

The physical exam

Here's what to expect:

The first order of business is checking your vital signs, reflexes, and blood pressure.

Sometimes measurements will be taken to determine arm and leg length. Next, you will be asked to do a series of simple and easy activities or exercises. These exercises will provide information about your motor skills, balance, and gait, among others. These tests also help determine your range of motion, muscle tone and strength, and integrity of your nervous system. Any abnormalities could provide clues about a condition. You may be asked to:

  • Bend forward, sideways, or backwards – Misaligned spinal vertebrae can sometimes be detected during this exercise.
  • Flex and extend your leg – This is a test for signs of sprain and helps determine the integrity of your joints (also called the "Yeoman's Test").
  • Grip something such as a rubber ball – Your grip strength is vital for showing signs of muscular or nerve damage.
  • Lie down and raise one leg – This is often referred to as the "Thomas Test," in which the chiropractor gently pushes on your raised leg to check for hip joint mobility.
  • Stand and raise one leg – This test can sometimes show whether you have sciatica, a nerve disorder in your lower back. Another test may involve pushing on your raised leg to determine whether you have pain, inflammation, or imbalance in the joints between your spinal vertebrae. (This is also called the "Psoas Muscle Test.")
  • Stand or sit – Posture can sometimes show whether you have misalignments in your spine.
  • Walk a straight line – This test measures your gait, and helps to determine if you have a normal walking pattern.
  • Walk in Place – Abnormalities in the way your pelvis and spine coordinate can be seen during this test.

Next, a short physical exam by the chiropractor will involve palpation, or use of the hands, to explore the alignment of your spine and other structures, as well as provide information on any stimuli that may cause pain. Depending on your condition, a series of diagnostic tests may follow. These tests may include MRIs, CT scans, X-rays, blood work, and other laboratory tests.

The chiropractor may also consult with you about making important lifestyle changes, such as exercise, nutrition, and smoking cessation to improve your chances of healing faster or preventing further injury.

Your First Visit
 
New Patient Information
New Patient Information
Welcome

Dr. Richey has been voted "Best Chiropractor". He receives referrals from local orthpedic surgeons and primary care doctors. He is extremely comprehensive and thorough. Therefore, we generally ask that you allow about 2 hours for your first appointment.

First Appointment Procedures...
1. New Patient Paperwork:

2. Consultation:

You'll meet Dr. Richey. He will review your health history and discuss your concerns as well as advise you whether or not he feels he could help you. If he does not believe he can help you, he may refer you to the appropriate doctor.

3. Examination:

Next, Dr. Richey will perform a physical examination including Orthopedic, Neurological, and Physiological tests to assist him in his thorough evaluation of your condition and to help determine the underlying causes of your presenting symptoms.

4. X-ray Exam:

If necessary, specific Digital X-ray views may be taken to help visualize the location of any spinal problems, reveal any pathology and make your care options more precise.

5. Evaluation:

Before proper care can be rendered, Dr. Richey will study your exam findings, X-rays and test results to prepare for his discussion with you that day or on your next appointment to review his findings and discuss an appropriate personalized treatment plan to assist in your recovery.

Your first visit is complete. Plan to spend another 30-45 minutes on this visit or your next to receive the doctor's report of findings and recommended plan of care. That's it!

6. Until Your Follow up Appointment:

Dr. Richey may suggest the application of ice, heat, or the use of some other procedure to help reduce inflammation and make you more comfortable.

What To Expect Your Next Visit...

Consultation and Treatment Review:

If he hadn't already done so, Dr. Richey will share with you your X-rays and test results, review his findings, and provide you with specific care recommendations and your personalized plan of treatment.

 


New Patient Information
Worker's Compensation Patients
Worker's Compensation Patients
Worker Compensation Patients


What can I expect if I was injured at work or on the job?

If you were injured at work or in the course of your employment and you are covered, Alaska Workers’ Compensation (Division) benefits will pay for your treatment here at the Accident and Injury Center of Alaska. The following is a brief summation of basic that you should know if you are injured on the job. More information is available online through the Division or by calling (907) 269-4980 in Anchorage. 

What is Workers’ Compensation?

Workers’ Compensation in Alaska is a program that requires your employer to provide medical and other benefits if you are injured where the injury or illness is caused by the work you performed for your employer.

Who is covered?

Nearly all Alaska employees are covered. Commercial fishers are an exception as are contract entertainers, some taxicab drivers, part-time babysitters, some cleaning persons, some participants in the Alaska temporary assistance program, some sports officials, harvest help and some realtors. 

What do I need to do if I am injured?

1. Get first aid or medical care immediately if needed. You may choose the physician.

2. Tell your supervisor, your employer or “the office” about the injury right away. You must give written notice to your employer and the Board within 30 days after the accident or when you think you have an illness caused by work. The Division provides the “Report of Occupational Injury or Illness” (form 6101) for this purpose. Obtain the form from your employer or the Division. Complete your part of the form and give your employer all the copies. After your employer completes its portion, your employer should give you the yellow copy. If your employer will not give you a form, contact the Division.

3. Write down your employer’s official name and address and the insurer’s name and address. Your employer must post a notice of insurance or self-insurance in three places where employees can easily see it. The employer’s name and address and the insurer’s name and address can be found on the posted notice of insurance. If your employer did not post a notice or if your employer will not give you the insurer’s name when you ask, contact the Division.

4. Write down your supervisor’s, foreman’s, or boss’s name. Also write down the names of the people who saw your accident or the work conditions that may have caused your illness.

5. Get treatment from one licensed doctor. Give the doctor your employer’s official name and address and the insurer’s name and address. Ask your doctor to forward a report to the insurer and the Board within 14 days of treatment. Give the insurer your doctor’s name and address right away.

6. You may change your treating doctor once. However, before you change doctors, tell the insurer that you are making a change. If you change doctors more than once without the insurer’s written consent, you may have to pay the doctor’s bills. If your treating doctor refers you to a specialist, this is not a change of doctors.

7. Keep receipts for medicine, actual travel expenses (including mileage) and other costs of your medical care. Give copies of the receipts and the mileage record to the insurer for reimbursement. If you do not keep receipts, you may not be eligible for reimbursement.

8. If your injury keeps you from working for more than three calendar days, forward copies of your W-2 forms, wage stubs, or other written records proving your earnings to the insurer. Do not send them to the Board or the Division as this will slow your payment. The insurer uses this information to calculate your weekly disability compensation rate. Employer provided room and board, contributions to pension plans and other employer provided benefits may be used in figuring your disability benefit rate. Provide the insurer with proof of employer contributions as soon as possible.

9. Take good care of yourself. Get needed treatment, follow your doctor’s advice, and act reasonably. Make every reasonable effort to get well and go back to work.

10. Immediately tell the insurer when you go back to work, get unemployment benefits, file for social security benefits, or change your address.

11. Contact the Division if you are not paid what you think you are owed.

12. Tell the truth. If you lie or submit false documents to obtain benefits, you are guilty of a crime which is punishable by a maximum fine of $50,000, imprisonment of up to 10 years, or both. You are also civilly liable to the person adversely affected. [AS 23.30.250]

13. Keep records of all phone calls and letters between you and the insurer.

What is the insurer supposed to do if you are injured?

The insurer usually learns of your injury from the Report of Injury which it receives from your employer. Within 21 days after the employer learns of your injury, the insurer must either begin to pay benefits or controvert (deny) them. If the insurer denies benefits, it must send you and the Board a Controversion Notice. The notice will explain how to file a written claim with the Board should you dispute the controversion.

 

How long do I have to report my injury?

Within 30 days after the injury, you must give the employer and the Board written notice of the injury. If you do not give this notice, your benefits will be barred unless the Board excuses your failure to give notice. If 30 days have passed and you have not given your employer written notice, contact the employer and the Division immediately. The notice of injury forms “Report of Occupational Injury of Illness (6101) is available from your employer or from the Division offices or on the internet at: http://www.labor.state.ak.us/wc/pdf_list.htm. You must complete this report and provide it to your employer within 30 days following your injury. You must complete the employee’s portion of the form (the top half) and give the form to your employer to complete and distribute.

What’s causing my pain?

It’s not uncommon to not realize you are hurt initially. It may be a few days or more before the pain starts to set in. Ligaments, joints and tendons start to swell and muscles spasm until you realize you are injured. If you are injured on the job, you have to report the injury to your employer within 30 days.

Injured muscles and joints often feel stiff and tender to pressure and may have a loss of normal motion. They can cause muscle weakness, muscle spasm, headaches or pain. Pain simply tells you that something is wrong. Taking drugs for pain and muscle spasms may provide temporary relief until you can get treated. The removal of the underlying reasons you are having pain is the goal of proper treatment.

What can I expect on my first visit to the Accident and Injury Center of Alaska?

We are a physical rehabilitation clinic. We do not prescribe narcotics or issue prescription drugs. Here at the Accident and Injury Center, we’ll discuss your case, take x-rays if needed, perform an examination, show you what’s wrong and what we can do for you. If you already have the yellow copy of the form on which you reported your injury to your employer, bring that with you. We will handle the paperwork for you from there. You can usually start physical treatment that same day.

What should I do first?

First, decide if you want to seek care in our office. Make sure you have reported your injury within the 30 day window. You may choose our doctor as your attending physician. If you have already seen a doctor, you may change doctors but will need to let your adjuster know you will be changing attending doctors to the Accident and Injury Center.

What should I do now?

Now, all you need to do is call us. We are the Accident and Injury Center of Alaska and are here to help you. Tell us you were injured at work and that you want to schedule a consultation. We will take it from there.

Call us today (907) 868-7821

 

IF YOU STILL HAVE QUESTIONS… or if you need additional information please call, write or come by the nearest Workers’ Compensation Division office:

ANCHORAGE:

Alaska Workers’ Compensation Division

3301 Eagle Street, Suite 304

Anchorage, Alaska

99503-4149

(907) 269-4980

 

THIS LIMITED SUMMARY IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATIONAL USE ONLY AND IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR LEGAL ADVICE OR COUNSEL.

Worker's Compensation Patients
Myofascial Therapy
Myofascial Therapy

Myofascial Therapy

Do we do massage or myofascial therapy?

Many patients walk out proclaiming that the "massage" in our office is the best they have ever had. We'll take that compliment but the reality is that most of what our office actually does are forms of "myofascial therapy". It is a higher level of service than traditional massage.

Myofascial therapy, sometimes referred to as Myofascial Release or MFR, differs from massage. Whereas basic massage (aka Swedish massage) may be relaxing or stimulating, myofascial therapy, as performed in the Accident and Injury Center of Alaska, serves to increase your ability to move in more normal, pain-free, ranges of motion; to increase the ability of your myofascial tissue move more freely; and to facilitate a return to functional activities of your daily life. It serves to decrease the formation of adhesions that may cause chronic pain syndromes if left untreated. Myofascial therapy is beneficial and may be effective in all stages of healing; acute, subacute and chronic. Depending on your presentation, our techniques may also include neuromuscular therapy, positional release, stretching and nearly any therapeutic technique performed manually for these purposes.




Myofascial Therapy
Do We Accept Insurance
Do We Accept Insurance
Do We Accept Insurance?

For Many patients want to know if we accept their insurance. We realize this is important to a lot of people. The good news is that most insurers cover our services. We are a preferred provider for Blue Cross but we are not Medicaid or Medicare providers.

For your convenience, the following is a partial list of the most common insurance carriers with which we have worked. If you do not see your insurance company on our short list, feel free to call us; we will be happy to check our complete list of companies for you over the phone. (907) 868-7821.

Automobile Insurance:

AIG - 21st Century
Allstate
Country Financial
Farmer's
Fireman's Fund
GEICO
GMAC
Hartford
Horace Mann
Mutual of Omaha
Progressive
SAFECO
Scottsdale
State Farm
Traveler's
USAA


Health Insurance:

Aetna
Alaska Care
Alaska Carpenters
Alaska Electric
Alaska Laborers
Alaska Pipe Trades
ARM Northwest
ASEA
Assurant Health
Blue Cross Blue Shield
CBCA Administrators
CIGNA
Cooperative Benefit
CorVel Corp
EBMS
Federal Blue Cross
First Choice
GEHA
Great West
HealthComp
HealthSmart
Infinity
MEGA Health
Meritain
MultiPlan
Northwest Sheet Metal
ODS Alaska
Operating Engineers
Painters' Trust
Principal
Providence Blue Cross
RBMS
Southern Alaska Carpenters
Starmark
UMR
United Healthcare
Wells Fargo / HealthSmart
WPAS
Zenith

Workers' Compensation:

Alaska National
American Seafoods
Anchorage School District
Broadspire
Carl Warren
Carrs Safeway
Chubb Group
Crawford & Company
Eberle Vivian
Frye  / Markel
GAB Robbins
Harbor Adjustment
Liberty Mutual
Liberty Northwest
Northern Adjusters
NovaPro
Port of Anchorage
Professional Adjusters of AK
Seabright
Sedgwick
Traveler's Work Comp
Ward North America
Wilton Adjustment
Zurich
Do We Accept Insurance
Welcome

Welcome to the Accident & Injury Center. The Accident & Injury Center has provided exceptional service to patients in the Anchorage area for over 12 years. We are located at 218 W. 34th Ave at the corner of C St and 34th Ave; one block north of 36th Ave.

The Accident & Injury Center is dedicated to providing the most current and effective care for each of our patients. We realize any clinic is only as good as the people that work there and the tools with which they work. We are staffed and equipped with the knowledge, experience and the treatment options to treat a much wider range of conditions by providing a comprehensive-based approach to healthcare.

Physical Therapy, Myofascial Therapy and/or Chiropractic may be new experiences for many of us. Often, we've heard good things through a friend or have done some research online. It's possible that you are just fed up with living in pain and have decided it's time to do something about it. In either case, your first visit to our office will really be about finding what may be wrong and what your treatment solutions may be by discussing your history, current condition and goals.

As with any doctor's visit, you'll start by finishing some new patient paperwork. Upon meeting with the doctor, you'll discuss your concerns and expectations as well as have the chance to ask any questions you may have. We will perform a physical examination and most likely take a some x-rays to see your current condition. Once this is complete, we'll take a look at the overall results of our consultation and the exam. Together, we can come up with a plan of action which will begin when you are completely satisfied and ready to move forward.

Choosing Accident & Injury Center of Anchorage is the first step towards better health. This website will explain many of the different services and therapies offered at Accident and Injury Center. Please do not hesitate to call us or come by with any questions or to schedule a visit. We are always here to help you. 



What To Do?
Who needs our care?
Who needs our care?
Who Should Seek Our Care?

All age groups are seek care in our office. We may already be the office your friends, family or co-workers use. We are well-trained and experienced to treat all age groups from adolescents to geriatrics. With a wide variety of treatment options, our office serves every age to help them be their best. 

Accident and Injury Patients - many patients we see have been in an auto accident or a work injury. However, many other patients come to us for care for all sorts of reasons.

Office Workers - Working too long at your desk, overly lifting and bending, and extended time at the office computer can result in tension and tightness making you more susceptible to headaches, neck, shoulder, and back stiffness and pain. 

Construction and Service Industry Workers - Anyone earning a living knows the importance of a healthy body. Unless your pain areas are caused by your job, your health insurance will usually cover you to seek care.

Injured Workers - If you were injured at work or your work has caused your injuries, you can seek care using your Workers' Compensation benefits. Report your claim to your employer and bring in your "Report of Occupational Illness or Injury" form and we will take if from there for you.

Auto Accident Victims - If you were injured in a motor vehicle accident, it is likely you may seek care in our office, whether or not it was your fault of the fault of the other driver. Each case is different and our office can answer just about any questions you may have.

Physical Therapy Patients- We do not require you have a referral before you come to our office for physical therapy (PT). However, many times a clinician has already recommended you try physical therapy. Many of our patients call with a referral scrip in hand. We can accept the referral and communicate directly with your doctor or clinician; MD, DO, DC, PA-C or Nurse Practitioner.

Post Surgery Patients- We also treat many patients that have had surgery and their surgeon has recommended they seek PT. Simply bring in your referral scrip and we can accept the referral and communicate directly with your surgeon.

Who should seek our care?
Injured at Work?
Injured at Work?
What to do - Injured at Work?

Do you have a work-related or job-related claim in Alaska? Most industrial, construction, or other work-related injuries that occur while an Alaskan worker is on the job or in the course of the job must be handled as a Workers' Compensation claim. 

Work injuries can be the result of:

  • Accidents (i.e. falling off a scaffold or heavy lifting while bending)
  • Repetitive trauma (e.g. computer work that leads to neck pain and carpal tunnel).

In Alaska, employees have the right to claim Workers' Compensation benefits, just as they have the right to other benefits like health insurance or unemployment. Alaskan employees have specific rights and responsibilities when filing a Workers' Compensation claim. As the attending physician, we have our responsibilities as well. After you report your injury to your employer, bring the yellow copy of this report to our office where we will perform an examination, take any necessary x-rays and file an initial report for you. If you are injured at work, we recommend you seek treatment as soon as possible. Be sure to advise Dr. Richey that you were injured on the job.

 

What to do - Injured at Work?
Auto Accident?
Auto Accident?
What to do - Auto Accident

For most people, driving is the most dangerous thing they will do all day. On average, drivers will be involved in a motor vehicle collision about once every 18 years of driving. Unfortunately, drivers can expect, on average, to be in 3 to 4 collisions in their lifetime. Approximately 10,000,000 automobile collisions occur every year in the U.S. While many accidents are minor, serious personal injury can occur. Statistics show, over 2,000,000 people are injured in motor vehicle collisions each year. Furthermore, automobile crashes are the leading cause of death for people ages 1 to 33. 

If you are involved in a motor vehicle collision and the other driver is found negligent, the negligent driver is likely responsible for all of your damages.

Negligence is the failure to use reasonable care. That is, negligence is measured against what a reasonable person would have done under the same or similar circumstances. 

If the other driver is found to have acted unreasonably (i.e. negligently), then you are generally entitled to receive monetary compensation for your property damage, present and future medical expenses, wage loss, and loss of earning potential. Furthermore, you may be entitled to compensation for your pain and suffering, emotional distress, loss of opportunity to enjoy life, and other similar damages. 

Alaska requires every driver to carry automobile liability insurance. However, if you have suffered a personal injury in an automobile crash with a driver who either does not have insurance, does not have enough insurance, or who was a hit and run driver, you may still be able to recover damages for your injuries under what is known as underinsured or uninsured motorist coverage. The law enables you to file a claim with your own insurance company to recover for injuries caused by drivers with insufficient or no insurance.

Furthermore, in Alaska, not only is the driver of the at-fault vehicle responsible to anyone injured in an accident, but so may be the owner of the vehicle. Under the legal theory of “vicarious responsibility,” the vehicle owner is responsible for the negligence of an operator, when that operation occurs with the permission of the owner.

Every insurance company has a team of adjusters, investigators and attorneys whose primary responsibility is to limit the liability of their insurance company and to minimize the amount of money paid to injured parties; its nothing personal, its just their job. Our job is to treat you well, keep a record of your treatment and your response. The good news is that with good care, good response and good records, most cases we see do not require an attorney to settle; it keeps the costs down for everyone involved. However, if you feel an insurance company or their representatives are not treating you fairly or you have any specific legal questions, we recommend you contact a local experienced personal injury attorney. If you already have an attorney, we will work with them at your request.

It is also important to remember there are time limits, so if you or a loved one has been injured in an auto accident, we recommend an examination as soon as possible. Bring any records you may have; police report, insurance information for both vehicles, health insurance card, hospital or doctor's records, x-rays, etc

What to do - Auto Accident?

The Accident and Injury Center of Alaska is a physical rehabilitation clinic. We offer a unique combination of licensed Physical Therapy, Chiropractic and Myofascial Therapies to best serve our patients. We have an excellent reputation in Alaska of returning our patients to work and to their normal activities as quickly as possible. Because we are a larger clinic, we can usually get patients in and out more efficiently so they can go on with their busy schedules.

Our services are covered by most Health Insurances, Alaska Workers Compensation, and Automobile Insurers. If an accident was not your fault, we can often care for you and wait be paid afterwards. Should you need and hire legal counsel, we will promptly transfer your information to the attorney of your choosing when you have finished with your care. Every case is different, so feel free to call or come in and speak with our friendly and helpful staff. Let us help you.

"Remember, your health is our business"

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Notice of Privacy Practices
Notice of Privacy Practices
 
In compliance with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, we, the Accident & Injury Center of Alaska, are required to present this notice of privacy practices to you as a new patient.
 
NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES
 
THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY.
 
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT THIS NOTICE PLEASE CONTACT OUR PRIVACY OFFICER.
This Notice of Privacy Practices describes how Accident & Injury Center of Alaska Inc herein after referred to as the Clinic, may use and disclose your protected health information to carry out treatment, payment or health care operations and for other purposes that are permitted or required by law. It also describes your rights to access and control your protected health information. “Protected health information” is information about you, including demographic information, that may identify you and that relates to your past, present or future physical or mental health or condition and related health care services.
 
The Clinic and all clinic personnel are required to abide by the terms of this Notice of Privacy Practices. We may change the terms of our notice, at any time. The new notice will be effective for all protected health information that we maintain at that time. Upon your request, we will provide you with any revised Notice of Privacy Practices. You may request a revised version by accessing our website, or calling the office and requesting that a revised copy be sent to you in the mail or asking for one at the time of your next appointment.
 
1. USES AND DISCLOSURES OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION
Your protected health information may be used and disclosed by your physician, our office staff and others outside of our office who are involved in your care and treatment for the purpose of providing health care services to you. Your protected health information may also be used and disclosed to pay your health care bills and to support the operation of your physician’s practice. Following are examples of the types of uses and disclosures of your protected health information that the Clinic is permitted to make. These examples are not meant to be exhaustive, but to describe the types of uses and disclosures that may be made by our office.
 
Treatment: We will use and disclose your protected health information to provide, coordinate, or manage your health care and any related services. This includes the coordination or management of your health care with another provider. For example, we would disclose your protected health information, as necessary, to the primary care physician that provides care to you. We will also disclose protected health information to other physicians who may be treating you. For example, your protected health information may be provided to a physician to whom you have been referred to ensure that the physician has the necessary information to diagnose or
treat you. In addition, we may disclose your protected health information from time-to-time to another physician or health care provider (e.g., a specialist or laboratory) who, at the request of your physician, becomes involved in your care by providing assistance with your health care diagnosis or treatment to your physician.
 
Payment: Your protected health information will be used and disclosed, as needed, to obtain payment for your health care services provided by us or by another provider. This may include certain activities that your health insurance plan may undertake before it approves or pays for the health care services we recommend for you such as: making a determination of eligibility or coverage for insurance benefits, reviewing services provided to you for medical necessity, and undertaking utilization review activities. For example, obtaining approval for a diagnostic test, such as an MRI, may require that your relevant protected health information be disclosed to the health plan to obtain approval for the MRI to be performed.
 
Health Care Operations: We may use or disclose, as needed, your protected health information in order to support the business activities of your physician’s practice. These activities include, but are not limited to, quality assessment activities, employee review activities, training of chiropractic students, licensing, and conducting or arranging for other business activities. We will share your protected health information with third party “business associates” that perform various activities (for example, billing or transcription services) for our practice. Whenever an arrangement between our office and a business associate involves the use or disclosure of your protected health information, we will have a written contract that contains terms that will protect the privacy of your protected health information. We may use or disclose your protected health information, as necessary, to provide you with information about treatment alternatives or other health-related benefits and services that may be of interest to you. You may contact our Privacy Officer to request that these materials not be sent to you.
 
We may use or disclose your demographic information and the dates that you received treatment from your physician, as necessary, in order to contact you for fundraising activities supported by our office. If you do not want to receive these materials, please contact our Privacy Officer and request that these fundraising materials not be sent to you.
 
Other Permitted and Required Uses and Disclosures That May Be Made Without Your Authorization or Opportunity to Agree or Object
 
We may use or disclose your protected health information in the following situations without your authorization or providing you the opportunity to agree or object. These situations include:
 
REQUIRED BY LAW: WE MAY USE OR DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO THE EXTENT THAT THE USE OR DISCLOSURE IS REQUIRED BY LAW. THE USE OR DISCLOSURE WILL BE MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE LAW AND WILL BE LIMITED TO THE RELEVANT REQUIREMENTS OF THE LAW. YOU WILL BE NOTIFIED, IF REQUIRED BY LAW, OF ANY SUCH USES OR DISCLOSURES.
 
PUBLIC HEALTH: WE MAY DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIVITIES AND PURPOSES TO A PUBLIC HEALTH AUTHORITY THAT IS PERMITTED BY LAW TO COLLECT OR RECEIVE THE INFORMATION. FOR EXAMPLE, A DISCLOSURE MAY BE MADE FOR THE PURPOSE OF PREVENTING OR CONTROLLING DISEASE, INJURY OR DISABILITY.
 
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: WE MAY DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION, IF AUTHORIZED BY LAW, TO A PERSON WHO MAY HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO A COMMUNICABLE DISEASE OR MAY OTHERWISE BE AT RISK OF CONTRACTING OR SPREADING THE DISEASE OR CONDITION.
 
HEALTH OVERSIGHT: WE MAY DISCLOSE PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO A HEALTH OVERSIGHT AGENCY FOR ACTIVITIES AUTHORIZED BY LAW, SUCH AS AUDITS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND INSPECTIONS. OVERSIGHT AGENCIES SEEKING THIS INFORMATION INCLUDE GOVERNMENT AGENCIES THAT OVERSEE THE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM, GOVERNMENT BENEFIT PROGRAMS, OTHER GOVERNMENT REGULATORY PROGRAMS AND CIVIL RIGHTS LAWS.
 
ABUSE OR NEGLECT: WE MAY DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO A PUBLIC HEALTH AUTHORITY THAT IS AUTHORIZED BY LAW TO RECEIVE REPORTS OF CHILD ABUSE OR NEGLECT. IN ADDITION, WE MAY DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION IF WE BELIEVE THAT YOU HAVE BEEN A VICTIM OF ABUSE, NEGLECT OR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TO THE GOVERNMENTAL ENTITY OR AGENCY AUTHORIZED TO
RECEIVE SUCH INFORMATION. IN THIS CASE, THE DISCLOSURE WILL BE MADE CONSISTENT WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF APPLICABLE FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS.
 
FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION: WE MAY DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO A PERSON OR COMPANY REQUIRED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION FOR THE PURPOSE OF QUALITY, SAFETY, OR EFFECTIVENESS OF FDAREGULATED PRODUCTS OR ACTIVITIES INCLUDING, TO REPORT ADVERSE EVENTS, PRODUCT DEFECTS OR PROBLEMS, BIOLOGIC PRODUCT DEVIATIONS, TO TRACK PRODUCTS; TO ENABLE PRODUCT RECALLS; TO MAKE REPAIRS OR REPLACEMENTS, OR TO CONDUCT POST MARKETING SURVEILLANCE, AS REQUIRED.
 
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS: WE MAY DISCLOSE PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION IN THE COURSE OF ANY JUDICIAL OR ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDING, IN RESPONSE TO AN ORDER OF A COURT OR ADMINISTRATIVE TRIBUNAL (TO THE EXTENT SUCH DISCLOSURE IS EXPRESSLY AUTHORIZED), OR IN CERTAIN CONDITIONS IN RESPONSE TO A SUBPOENA, DISCOVERY REQUEST OR OTHER LAWFUL PROCESS.
 
LAW ENFORCEMENT: WE MAY ALSO DISCLOSE PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION, SO LONG AS APPLICABLE LEGAL REQUIREMENTS ARE MET, FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT PURPOSES. THESE LAW ENFORCEMENT PURPOSES INCLUDE (1) LEGAL PROCESSES AND OTHERWISE REQUIRED BY LAW, (2) LIMITED INFORMATION REQUESTS FOR IDENTIFICATION AND LOCATION PURPOSES, (3) PERTAINING TO VICTIMS OF A CRIME, (4) SUSPICION THAT DEATH HAS OCCURRED AS A RESULT OF CRIMINAL CONDUCT, (5) IN THE EVENT THAT A CRIME OCCURS ON THE PREMISES OF OUR PRACTICE, AND (6) MEDICAL EMERGENCY (NOT ON OUR PRACTICE’S PREMISES) AND IT IS LIKELY THAT A CRIME HAS OCCURRED.
 
CORONERS, FUNERAL DIRECTORS, AND ORGAN DONATION: WE MAY DISCLOSE PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO A CORONER OR MEDICAL EXAMINER FOR IDENTIFICATION PURPOSES, DETERMINING CAUSE OF DEATH OR FOR THE CORONER OR MEDICAL EXAMINER TO PERFORM OTHER DUTIES AUTHORIZED BY LAW. WE MAY ALSO DISCLOSE PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO A FUNERAL DIRECTOR, AS AUTHORIZED BY LAW, IN ORDER TO PERMIT THE FUNERAL DIRECTOR TO CARRY OUT THEIR DUTIES. WE MAY DISCLOSE SUCH INFORMATION IN REASONABLE ANTICIPATION OF DEATH. PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED FOR CADAVERIC ORGAN, EYE OR TISSUE DONATION PURPOSES.
 
RESEARCH: WE MAY DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO RESEARCHERS WHEN THEIR RESEARCH HAS BEEN APPROVED BY AN INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD THAT HAS REVIEWED THE RESEARCH PROPOSAL AND ESTABLISHED PROTOCOLS TO ENSURE THE PRIVACY OF YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH  INFORMATION.
 
CRIMINAL ACTIVITY: CONSISTENT WITH APPLICABLE FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS, WE MAY DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION, IF WE BELIEVE THAT THE USE OR DISCLOSURE IS NECESSARY TO PREVENT OR LESSEN A SERIOUS AND IMMINENT THREAT TO THE HEALTH OR SAFETY OF A PERSON OR THE PUBLIC. WE MAY ALSO DISCLOSE PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION IF IT IS NECESSARY FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITIES TO IDENTIFY OR APPREHEND AN INDIVIDUAL.
 
MILITARY ACTIVITY AND NATIONAL SECURITY: WHEN THE APPROPRIATE CONDITIONS APPLY, WE MAY USE OR DISCLOSE PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION OF INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE ARMED FORCES PERSONNEL (1) FOR ACTIVITIES DEEMED NECESSARY BY APPROPRIATE MILITARY COMMAND AUTHORITIES; (2) FOR THE PURPOSE OF A DETERMINATION BY THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS OF YOUR ELIGIBILITY FOR BENEFITS, OR (3) TO FOREIGN MILITARY AUTHORITY IF YOU ARE A MEMBER OF THAT FOREIGN MILITARY
SERVICES. WE MAY ALSO DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO AUTHORIZED FEDERAL OFFICIALS FOR CONDUCTING NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTELLIGENCE ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING FOR THE PROVISION OF PROTECTIVE SERVICES TO THE PRESIDENT OR OTHERS LEGALLY AUTHORIZED.
 
WORKERS’ COMPENSATION: WE MAY DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION AS AUTHORIZED TO COMPLY WITH WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAWS AND OTHER SIMILAR LEGALLY-ESTABLISHED PROGRAMS.
 
INMATES: WE MAY USE OR DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION IF YOU ARE AN INMATE OF A CORRECTIONAL FACILITY AND YOUR PHYSICIAN CREATED OR RECEIVED YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION IN THE COURSE OF PROVIDING CARE TO YOU.
 
Uses and Disclosures of Protected Health Information Based upon Your Written Authorization
 
Other uses and disclosures of your protected health information will be made ONLY with your written authorization, unless otherwise permitted or required by law as described below. You may revoke this authorization in writing at any time. If you revoke your authorization, we will no longer use or disclose your protected health information for the reasons covered by your written authorization. Please understand that we are unable to take back any disclosures already  made with your authorization.
 
Other Permitted and Required Uses and Disclosures That Require Providing You the Opportunity to Agree or Object
 
We may use and disclose your protected health information in the following instances. You have the opportunity to agree or object to the use or disclosure of all or part of your protected health information. If you are not present or able to agree or object to the use or disclosure of the protected health information, then your physician may, using professional judgment, determine whether the disclosure is in your best interest.
 
OTHERS INVOLVED IN YOUR HEALTH CARE OR PAYMENT FOR YOUR CARE: UNLESS YOU OBJECT, WE MAY DISCLOSE TO A MEMBER OF YOUR FAMILY, A RELATIVE, A CLOSE FRIEND OR ANY OTHER PERSON YOU IDENTIFY, YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION THAT DIRECTLY RELATES TO THAT PERSON’S INVOLVEMENT IN YOUR HEALTH CARE. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO AGREE OR OBJECT TO SUCH A DISCLOSURE, WE MAY DISCLOSE SUCH INFORMATION AS NECESSARY IF WE DETERMINE THAT IT IS IN
YOUR BEST INTEREST BASED ON OUR PROFESSIONAL JUDGMENT. WE MAY USE OR DISCLOSE PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO NOTIFY OR ASSIST IN NOTIFYING A FAMILY MEMBER, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OR ANY OTHER PERSON THAT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR CARE OF YOUR LOCATION, GENERAL CONDITION OR DEATH.
 
FINALLY, WE MAY USE OR DISCLOSE YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO AN AUTHORIZED PUBLIC OR PRIVATE ENTITY TO ASSIST IN DISASTER RELIEF EFFORTS AND TO COORDINATE USES AND DISCLOSURES TO FAMILY OR OTHER INDIVIDUALS INVOLVED IN YOUR HEALTH CARE.
 
2. YOUR RIGHTS
Following is a statement of your rights with respect to your protected health information and a brief description of how you may exercise these rights.
 
You have the right to inspect and copy your protected health information. This means you may inspect and obtain a copy of protected health information about you for so long as we maintain the protected health information. You may obtain your medical record that contains medical and billing records and any other records that your physician and the practice uses for making decisions about you. As permitted by federal or state law, we may charge you a reasonable copy fee for a copy of your records.
 
Under federal law, however, you may not inspect or copy the following records: psychotherapy notes; information compiled in reasonable anticipation of, or use in, a civil, criminal, or administrative action or proceeding; and laboratory results that are subject to law that prohibits access to protected health information. Depending on the circumstances, a decision to deny access may be reviewable. In some circumstances, you may have a right to have this decision reviewed. Please contact our Privacy Officer if you have questions about access to your medical record.
 
You have the right to request a restriction of your protected health information. This means you may ask us not to use or disclose any part of your protected health information for the purposes of treatment, payment or health care operations. You may also request that any part of your protected health information not be disclosed to family members or friends who may be involved in your care or for notification purposes as described in this Notice of Privacy Practices. Your request must state the specific restriction requested and to whom you want the restriction to apply.
 
Your physician is not required to agree to a restriction that you may request. If your physician does agree to the requested restriction, we may not use or disclose your protected health information in violation of that restriction unless it is needed to provide emergency treatment. With this in mind, please discuss any restriction you wish to request with your physician. You may request a restriction by completing the Patient Request for Special Confidential Communication Procedures Form.
 
You have the right to request to receive confidential communications from us by alternative means or at an alternative location. We will accommodate reasonable requests.
 
We may also condition this accommodation by asking you for information as to how payment will be handled or specification of an alternative address or other method of contact. We will not request an explanation from you as to the basis for the request. Please make this request in writing to our Privacy Officer.
 
You may have the right to have your physician amend your protected health information.
This means you may request an amendment of protected health information about you in a designated record set for so long as we maintain this information. In certain cases, we may deny your request for an amendment. If we deny your request for amendment, you have the right to file a statement of disagreement with us and we may prepare a rebuttal to your statement and will provide you with a copy of any such rebuttal. Please contact our Privacy Officer if you have questions about amending your medical record.
 
You have the right to receive an accounting of certain disclosures we have made, if any, of your protected health information. This right applies to disclosures for purposes other than treatment, payment or health care operations as described in this Notice of Privacy Practices. It excludes disclosures we may have made to you if you authorized us to make the disclosure, for a facility directory, to family members or friends involved in your care, or for notification purposes, for national security or intelligence, to law enforcement (as provided in the privacy rule) or correctional facilities, as part of a limited data set disclosure. You have the right to receive specific information regarding these disclosures that occur after April 14, 2003. The right to receive this information is subject to certain exceptions, restrictions and limitations.
 
You have the right to obtain a paper copy of this notice from us, upon request, even if you have agreed to accept this notice electronically.
 
3. COMPLAINTS
You may complain to us or to the Secretary of Health and Human Services if you believe your privacy rights have been violated by us. You may file a complaint with us by notifying our Privacy Officer of your complaint. We will not retaliate against you for filing a complaint. You may contact our Privacy Officer, at this phone number (907) 868-7821for further information about the complaint process.
 
This notice was published and becomes effective on this date: 9/23/2013.
Notice of Privacy Practices
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Alaska,Chiropractor,Chiropractic,Anchorage Chiropractor,Therapy,Massage,Alaska Chiropractor,Spine,Spinal Adjustment,Doctor,Physician,Accident,Injury,Neck,Back,Accident and Injury Center David Richey,Injury Center Anchorage,Anchorage Injury Center,Anchorage Accident Center,Anchorage David Richey,Chiropractor David Richey,Alaska Chiropractic,Anchorage Chiropractic

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